Understanding Types of Dementia

Understanding Types of Dementia
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nHave you ever wondered if Alzheimer’s disease was the same as dementia? Have you watched a loved one show signs of memory loss an assumed it was Alzheimer’s disease? Dementia is vast and broad. The term dementia covers several types of memory loss conditions. Today’s blog will discuss the types of dementia your loved could be experiencing.
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nAlzheimer’s disease as we discussed on Monday is the most widely recognized type of dementia. However, Alzheimer’s isn’t the only type of dementia. Educating ourselves about dementia will only help us or our loved ones when seeking medical advice or care.
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nVascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia. Individuals can experience vascular dementia after a brain injury; if the injury causes a reduction or blockage of blood flow in blood vessels leading to the brain and in the brain. Blockage or reductions in blood flow problems can be caused by many occurrences, from stroke, infection of a heart valve (endocarditis), to other blood vessel (vascular) conditions. Vascular dementia symptoms are usually suddenly, mostly likely occurring in people with high blood pressure or previous stroke and heart attack survivors.
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nLewy body is another type of dementia. Lewy body dementia affects ~ 10{f1f5b02ca83ae9345c27d7a0f347b955c156f0ed816b056299506a22f3a1765a} of people with dementia. It’s this statistic that makes Lewy body dementia another common dementia. Studies have shown that Lewy body dementia becomes more common with age. Similar to Alzheimer’s Lewy body dementia forms from abnormal clumps of protein in the brain. The symptoms are similar to Alzheimer’s as well. Though, it does have unique attributes which include lucidity (fluctuations between confusion and clear thinking), visual hallucinations, tremors and rigidity. People experiencing Lewy body dementia also often have a condition called rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder.
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nThen there’s Frontotemporal which is another type of dementia. What is unique about Frontotemporal dementia is that symptoms begin to show at younger ages than in Alzheimer’s disease. Individual’s experiencing Frontotemporal dementia start to show signs and symptoms as early as age 50. Frontotemporal dementia diseases are recognized by the breakdown of nerve cells in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain. It’s these areas of the brain where our personality, behavior and language are housed, so signs and symptoms can include inappropriate behaviors, language problems, difficulty thinking, concentrating, and movement problems. As with other dementias, the cause isn’t known, although in some cases this dementia is related to certain genetic mutations.
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nFinally, there are other types of disorders linked to dementia. Huntington’s disease, Traumatic Brain Injury, Creutzfeldt – Jakob disease, and Parkinson’s disease are some of the types of disorders linked to dementia.
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nAs well, it is good to know that not all dementias are permanent. Dementias can be brought on by infection, immune disorders, metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, nutritional deficiencies, reactions to medications, subdural hematomas, poisonings, brain tumors, anoxia, and normal- pressure hydrocephalus and all of these induced dementias can usually be reversed.
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nSo, it’s important to recognize that the more we understand about dementia more equipped we can be in prevention and care. Individuals are unique and every diagnosis is different, but, education is power.
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nJoin Evangelical Homes of Michigan, Glacier Hills Senior Living Community, Presbyterian Villages of Michigan and United Methodist Retirement Communities on Feb. 8, 2015 at 7pm at Michigan Theater in Ann Arbor, MI for the screening of “Glen Campbell’s I’ll Be Me” a documented journey of how he and his family navigated through the unpredictable terrain of this progressive disease.
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nArticle Sources:
nMayo Clinic:
nhttp://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dementia/basics/causes/con-20034399

2015-01-27T13:21:00+00:00 Uncategorized|